Hanai: Nourishing Words

To be nourished or not to be nourished? There is no question.

How India Changed My Life and Why Cirque du Soleil Made Me CryRumor had it India would challenge me, max out my sensory load, shake me to the core. And it did. The unexpected twist, however, was where all of this led me: To a deeper reflection on my own culture and myself. What India gifted me with was the opportunity for a grander perspective on the human experience. Chaos, suffering, insecurity, doubt bombarded me daily, over and over, sometimes all within the same 10 seconds. My limits? Transcended. My “I will never” list? Destroyed. I learned, while my fears were undeniable (and at times well-founded), indulging in my anxiety was always a choice. Thank you, India, for the myriad of opportunities to let go, to take risks (sometimes with every step), to exceed my comfort zone, … And ultimately, to exceed myself. This is why at Cirque du Soleil’s Totem, while watching human beings at the pinnacle of physical fitness execute gravity-defying feats, tears of awe spilled out of my eyes. The performers proved that “impossible” was optional. Temporary. If, like me, you have that nagging deep down, that faint whisper nudging you out of conventional existence, heed it. Who might we be if we learned to let go, if we took bigger risks despite our fears, if we trusted others to catch us when we needed them to? Of course, chaos, suffering, insecurity, doubt - like the hard, unforgiving floor beneath the Cirque du Soleil performers - won’t disappear. But maybe, just maybe, we can learn how to soar above it anyway.
- Daphne Jenkins

How India Changed My Life and Why Cirque du Soleil Made Me Cry

Rumor had it India would challenge me, max out my sensory load, shake me to the core. And it did. The unexpected twist, however, was where all of this led me: To a deeper reflection on my own culture and myself. What India gifted me with was the opportunity for a grander perspective on the human experience. Chaos, suffering, insecurity, doubt bombarded me daily, over and over, sometimes all within the same 10 seconds. My limits? Transcended. My “I will never” list? Destroyed. I learned, while my fears were undeniable (and at times well-founded), indulging in my anxiety was always a choice. Thank you, India, for the myriad of opportunities to let go, to take risks (sometimes with every step), to exceed my comfort zone, … And ultimately, to exceed myself. 

This is why at Cirque du Soleil’s Totem, while watching human beings at the pinnacle of physical fitness execute gravity-defying feats, tears of awe spilled out of my eyes. The performers proved that “impossible” was optional. Temporary. 

If, like me, you have that nagging deep down, that faint whisper nudging you out of conventional existence, heed it. Who might we be if we learned to let go, if we took bigger risks despite our fears, if we trusted others to catch us when we needed them to? Of course, chaos, suffering, insecurity, doubt - like the hard, unforgiving floor beneath the Cirque du Soleil performers - won’t disappear. But maybe, just maybe, we can learn how to soar above it anyway.

- Daphne Jenkins

Roe

Tucked away from the chaos of construction on SE Divison, inside the spirited Block + Tackle, this quaint restaurant shines like a precious pearl. Chefs Trent Pierce and Patrick Schultz offer an ever changing menu inspired by fresh line-caught fish, mostly from Hawaiian waters. 

Our reservations were for February 7th, aka Snowmageddon, but the host assured us Roe is always open. Always. Those lucky enough secure Chef’s Tasting reservations do not cancel. So, we donned our snowboots and trekked to Roe, then feasted on a four course meal that knocked our snow-sogged socks off. 

For the first course, we enjoyed delicate Pacific Northwest salmon and blue fin tuna.  Both fish melted like butter in the mouth. My dungeness crab in coconut milk edged out his seafood medley in the second course, but both of our third course selections wowed: his supple toro dressed with watercress and my seabass with tiny discs of squash and coconut arranged like modern art. For the finale, I selected the pear with spiced carrot cake with pecan praline and he the dehydrated chocolate mousse with coffee ganache, whisky caramel, and marshmallow gelato- Roe’s signature dessert- a menu mainstay. 

Roe is open Wednesday – Saturday from 5:15PM – 9:30PM.

Every night, one seven course Chef’s Tasting is offered to just a handful of lucky guests. The seating is at 6:15PM and books up months in advance.  

- Daphne Jenkins

What I capture depends on who I am in that moment as well as who I was in all the moments before that.
— Daphne Jenkins

What I capture depends on who I am in that moment as well as who I was in all the moments before that.

— Daphne Jenkins

The Poetry of Words and Light

I had never made the connection, never realized the two art forms are one in the same: poetry and photography. Today, it dawned on me that I have been making poems with my camera.

It startled me recently when the poems came to me in words, too, like surprise guests. An obliging hostess, I whittled them from my fingertips, and finished each one with tears.

Today as I reflected on the relationship between poetry and photography, I remembered this poem by Ezra Pound:

 In the Station of the Metro

The apparition of these faces in the crowd;

Petals on a wet, black bough. 

- Daphne Jenkins


In a Coffee Shop in Portland

From measured sips of this latte, A waning moon recedes within my glass.
- Daphne Jenkins
(inspired by Ezra Pound’s In a Station of the Metro)

In a Coffee Shop in Portland

From measured sips of this latte,
A waning moon recedes within my glass.

- Daphne Jenkins

(inspired by Ezra Pound’s In a Station of the Metro)